Health-care Reform Could Launch Despite A Federal Shutdown

4 Health-Care Industry Predictions for the Next 20 Years

Independent experts believe that “the effects of a government shutdown on the implementation of the ACA (Affordable Care Act) are likely to be pretty small,” said Paul Van de Water, a policy analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a Washington-based non-profit think tank. The main reason, he said, is that the money flowing to the 16 states and the nation’s capital that are running their own ACA exchange is what’s called a “permanent appropriation,” enshrined in the 2010 healthcare reform law. Because the funds are not subject to annual appropriations, they will continue to be available to states that need to pay employees and contractors and buy equipment and supplies. What is even less clear is the ability of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to operate a federal data “hub” that underpins both the state-run exchanges and the 34 state exchanges that fall under the purview of the administration.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2013/0922/Health-care-reform-could-launch-despite-a-federal-shutdown

How College Health Centers Help Students Succeed

students running

New technology is also expensive. And some health centers are also facing a serious need for facility maintenance and improvement. The Affordable Care Act brings other changes and challenges to health centers. Its provisions are resulting in better protection for students, who can remain under their parents plans (up to age 26) or subscribe to their colleges own plan, which must meet new federal standards, including complete coverage for contraceptives and other preventive services. Schools offering plans that dont comply will have to beef up the coverage.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.forbes.com/sites/collegeprose/2013/09/23/how-college-health-centers-help-students-succeed/

Over their lifetimes, men currently have about a 1-in-2 chance of developing some form of invasive cancer, while women have around a 1-in-3 chance. Although we’ve seen advancements in progression-free survival across many cancer types, and surgery and radiation techniques have become more precise, we are hardly any closer to finding a cure than we were 20 years ago. Take lung cancer and pancreatic cancer as perfect examples. In 1975-1977, the five-year survival rates of these cancer types was 12% and 2%, respectively. Fast-forwarding three decades to 2002-2008’s data, and these figures progressed to just 17% and 6%. We’re seeing progress, but a vast majority of it has come from better awareness of the risk factors for these cancer types instead of better medication.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/09/22/4-health-care-industry-predictions-for-the-next-20.aspx

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